Last modified on 3 September 2014, at 01:33

EnglishEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Middle English den, from Old English denn (den, lair (of a beast), cave; a swine-pasture, a woodland pasture for swine), from Proto-Germanic *danjō (threshing-floor, barn-floor), from Proto-Indo-European *dʰen- (flat surface, board, sheet, area, palm of the hand). Cognate with Scots den (den, lair), Dutch denne (burrow, den, cave, attic), Dutch den (ship's deck, threshing-floor, mountain floor), Middle Low German denne, danne (threshing-floor, small dale), German Tenne (threshing-floor).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

den (plural dens)

  1. A small cavern or hollow place in the side of a hill, or among rocks; especially, a cave used by a wild animal for shelter or concealment.
    a den of robbers
    Daniel was put into the lions’ den.
  2. A squalid or wretched place; a haunt.
    a den of vice
    an opium den; a gambling den
  3. A comfortable room not used for formal entertaining.
  4. (UK, Scotland, obsolete) A narrow glen; a ravine; a dell.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Shakespeare to this entry?)
SynonymsEdit
TranslationsEdit

VerbEdit

den (third-person singular simple present dens, present participle denning, simple past and past participle denned)

  1. (reflexive) To ensconce or hide oneself in (or as in) a den.

Etymology 2Edit

From Old French denier, from Latin denarius.

AbbreviationEdit

den

  1. Abbreviation of denier (a unit of weight)

AnagramsEdit


BambaraEdit

NounEdit

den

  1. child
  2. fruit

Derived termsEdit

(Sense 1)

VerbEdit

den (intransitive)

  1. to bear fruit

BretonEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Celtic *gdonyo- (human, person), from Proto-Indo-European *dʰéǵʰom-yo- (earthling, human), a derivation of *dʰéǵʰōm (earth).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

den m

  1. human being
  2. person, man
  3. husband

CornishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Celtic *gdonyo- (human, person), from Proto-Indo-European *dʰéǵʰom-yo- (earthling, human), a derivation of *dʰéǵʰōm (earth).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

den m (plural tus)

  1. man
  2. person

CzechEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Slavic *dьnь, from Proto-Balto-Slavic, from Proto-Indo-European *déi-no-, ultimately from *dyew-, *dyeu- (to shine).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

den m inanimate

  1. day

DeclensionEdit

Derived termsEdit


DanishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Norse þann, the accusative form of , from Proto-Germanic *sa (that), from Proto-Indo-European *só (this, that).

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /dən/, /dɛn/, [d̥ən] or [ˈd̥ɛnˀ]
  • Rhymes: -ɛn, -ən

ArticleEdit

den c (neuter det, plural de)

  1. (definite) the (used before an adjective preceding a noun)
    bilen - the car; den røde bil - the red car

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /dɛn/, [d̥ɛnˀ] or IPA(key): /dən/, [d̥ən]

PronounEdit

den c (neuter det, plural de)

  1. (demonstrative) that, the
  2. (personal) it

See alsoEdit


DutchEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Middle Dutch dan, danne, denne (pine tree). Ultimately from Proto-Germanic *danwō-, *danjō- "pine tree". Cognate with German Tann.

NounEdit

den m (plural dennen, diminutive dennetje n)

  1. pine, pine tree
SynonymsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

ArticleEdit

den (definite)

  1. (archaic) Dative (singular or plural) masculine form of de.
  2. (archaic) Dative (singular) neuter form of het.
    In den beginne schiep God den hemel en de aarde — In the beginning God created the heaven and the earth
  3. (archaic) Accusative singular masculine form of de.
    De baron gaf den koetsier een wenk en het rijtuig rolde heen. — The baron gave the coachman a sign and the carriage rode away. (from the story Gaston von Frankrijk by J.J.A. Goeverneur)
  4. (dialectal) Masculine (singular) definite article.
DeclensionEdit
Dutch definite article
Masculine Feminine Neuter Plural
Nominative de de het de
Genitive des der des der
Dative den der den den
Accusative den de het de


Derived termsEdit
Usage notesEdit
  • The use of den was dropped from written Dutch during the spelling reform of 1947; de is now used instead.
  • Normally only the nominative is used; other forms are archaic but survive in a number of idiomatic expressions.

GermanEdit

PronunciationEdit

ArticleEdit

den (definite)

  1. the; accusative masculine singular of der
  2. the; dative plural for all genders of der

DeclensionEdit

German definite articles
Masculine Feminine Neuter Plural
Nominative der die das die
Genitive des der des der
Dative dem der dem den
Accusative den die das die


PronounEdit

den

  1. that; whom; accusative singular of der

IrishEdit

ContractionEdit

den

  1. Contraction of de an.
    Bhris mé den chrann é. ― I broke it off the tree.
    Fuair sé bás den ocras. ― He died of hunger.

Usage notesEdit

This contraction is obligatory, i.e. *de an never appears uncontracted. It triggers lenition of a following consonant other than d, s, or t.


JapaneseEdit

RomanizationEdit

den

  1. rōmaji reading of でん

LojbanEdit

RafsiEdit

den

  1. rafsi of denci.

LuxembourgishEdit

DeterminerEdit

den m

  1. unstressed form of deen

DeclensionEdit

Luxembourgish definite articles
masculine feminine neuter plural
nom./acc. deen (den) déi (d') dat (d') déi (d')
dative deem (dem) där (der) deem (dem) deen (den)

MalayEdit

PronunciationEdit

PronounEdit

den

  1. I, me, my

See alsoEdit


MandarinEdit

RomanizationEdit

den

  1. Nonstandard spelling of dēn.
  2. Nonstandard spelling of dèn.

Usage notesEdit

  • English transcriptions of Mandarin speech often fail to distinguish between the critical tonal differences employed in the Mandarin language, using words such as this one without the appropriate indication of tone.

Norwegian BokmålEdit

PronounEdit

den (genitive dens)

  1. it; third person singular, masculine/feminine gender. Nominative, accusative or dative.

PronounEdit

den n

  1. (demonstrative pronoun) that

ArticleEdit

den n

  1. The; only used if there is an adjective in front of the noun.
    bilen: the car → den røde bilen: the red car

Related termsEdit


Norwegian NynorskEdit

PronounEdit

den m, f (neuter det, plural dei)

  1. (demonstrative pronoun) that

ArticleEdit

den

  1. the; only used if there is an adjective in front of the noun.
    Han køyrde den raude bilen.
    He drove the red car.

NovialEdit

ConjunctionEdit

den

  1. for (indicating the reason justifying a given deduction)

SpanishEdit

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

den

  1. Second-person plural (ustedes) present subjunctive form of dar.
  2. Third-person plural (ellos, ellas, also used with ustedes?) present subjunctive form of dar.
  3. Second-person plural (ustedes) imperative form of dar.

SwedishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Norse þann, accusative of , from Proto-Germanic *sa.

PronunciationEdit

PronounEdit

den c

  1. it
  2. that

DeclensionEdit

ArticleEdit

den c (definite)

  1. (before an adjective preceding a noun) the
    den röda bilen - “the red car”

Related termsEdit