despond

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin despondere ‘give up, abandon’, from de- + spondere ‘promise’.

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

despond (third-person singular simple present desponds, present participle desponding, simple past and past participle desponded)

  1. To give up the will, courage, or spirit; to become dejected, lose heart.
    • Scott's Letters
      I should despair, or at least despond.
    • John Locke
      Others depress their own minds, [and] despond at the first difficulty.
    • D. Webster
      We wish that [] desponding patriotism may turn its eyes hitherward, and be assured that foundations of our national power still stand strong.

TranslationsEdit

NounEdit

despond (uncountable)

  1. (archaic) Despondency.

Related termsEdit

SynonymsEdit

Last modified on 8 April 2014, at 12:48