devil take the hindmost

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PhraseEdit

Devil take the hindmost

  1. An imprecation that everyone should look after their own interests, leaving those who cannot cope to whatever fate befalls them
    • 1843, Thomas Carlyle, Past and Present, book 3, ch. VI, Two Centuries
      And [we] coldly see the all-conquering valiant Sons of Toil sit enchanted, by the million, in their Poor-Law Bastille, as if this were Nature’s Law; — mumbling to ourselves some vague janglement of Laissez-faire, Supply-and-demand, Cash-payment the one nexus of man to man: Free-trade, Competition, and Devil take the hindmost, our latest Gospel yet preached!
    • 1915, W.S. Maugham, "Of Human Bondage", chapter CVIII:
      "Oh, don't talk to me about your socialists, I've got no patience with them," she cried. "It only means that another lot of lazy loafers will make a good thing out of the working classes. My motto is, leave me alone; I don't want anyone interfering with me; I'll make the best of a bad job, and the devil take the hindmost."
Last modified on 22 June 2012, at 16:04