dewan

EnglishEdit

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Wikipedia

EtymologyEdit

Ultimately from Persian دیوان (dīvān).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

dewan (plural dewans)

  1. (historical) A holder of any of various offices in various (usually Islamic) countries, usually some sort of councillor.
    • 1688, E. Farr and E. H. Nolan, The History of England in Three Volumes, volume 3[1]:
      At the same time, Rajah Goordass, son of Nuncomar, was appointed dewan to the nabob, whose duties were strictly to be confined to the household, and who was to have nothing to do with the public business or public revenues of Bengal.
    • 1899, Allen Upward, Athelstane Ford[2]:
      On these occasions I often heard him declare that the whole of Europe did not contain ten thousand men, and that as for King George, he was only fit to be a dewan or zamindar under himself.
    • 1921, Glyn Barlow, The Story of Madras[3]:
      Inviting himself and his dewan and his chamberlain to dinner with the Governor and Councillors in the Fort, he was received with imposing honours, and was feasted in the Council Chamber at a magnificent banquet.

MalayEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Persian دیوان (dīvān)

NounEdit

dewan

  1. hall
  2. council
Last modified on 19 June 2013, at 17:19