EnglishEdit

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PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

Since the early 19th century, of disputed origin. Most commonly thought to be from dibstones (counters used in a game with the same name). Also from dib (to tap) or related to northern English dip (small depression in the ground), or a shortened version of divide

NounEdit

dibs (uncountable)

  1. (informal) A claim to the right to use or enjoy something exclusively or before anyone else.
    Dibs means I get the hammock.
    Who's got dibs on the chips?
    • 2011 March 23, “We asked mayoral candidates: Do you support 'dibs' on parking spots?”, Chicago Sun-Times:
      Del Valle has the blessing of a garage, so he doesn't have to claim “dibs” on shoveled street spots himself, he said.
    • 2012 February 16, “Our View: Public Employees Bill of Rights Act all wrong”, Appeal-Democrat:
      It aims to give unionized California government workers "more workplace discipline protections and first dibs on state government work," as the Sacramento Bee put it.
SynonymsEdit
Derived termsEdit
TranslationsEdit

VerbEdit

dibs (third-person singular simple present dibses, present participle dibsing, simple past and past participle dibsed)

  1. To claim a temporary right to (something); to reserve.
SynonymsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

NounEdit

dibs (uncountable)

  1. (dated) A sweet preparation or treacle of grape juice, much used in the East.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Johnston to this entry?)

Etymology 3Edit

NounEdit

dibs

  1. plural form of dib
  2. (obsolete) A child's game, played with dib bones.

AnagramsEdit

Last modified on 8 April 2014, at 15:32