Last modified on 7 December 2014, at 01:45

dico

FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

Apocopic form of dictionnaire +‎ -o.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

dico m (plural dicos)

  1. (informal) dictionary
    J'adore ce dico!
    I love this dictionary

External linksEdit


ItalianEdit

VerbEdit

dico

  1. first-person singular present tense of dire

LatinEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Proto-Italic *deikō, from Proto-Indo-European *deyḱ- (to show, point out). Cognates include Oscan 𐌃𐌄𐌉𐌊𐌖𐌌 (deíkum, to show, point out), Sanskrit दिशति (diśáti), Ancient Greek δείκνυμι (deíknumi) and Old English tǣċan (English teach).

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˈdiː.koː/
  • (file)

VerbEdit

present active dīcō, present infinitive dīcere, perfect active dīxī, supine dictum

  1. I say, utter; mention; talk, speak.
    Dixit duas res ei rubori fuisse.
    He said that two things had abashed him.
  2. I declare, state.
    1. I affirm, assert (positively).
  3. I tell.
  4. I appoint, fix, name (to an office).
  5. I call, name.
  6. (law, followed by ad) I plead (before).
  7. I speak in reference to, refer to.
InflectionEdit
SynonymsEdit
Derived termsEdit
DescendantsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

EB1911 - Volume 01 - Page 001 - 1.svg This entry lacks etymological information. If you are familiar with the origin of this term, please add it to the page as described here.

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

present active dicō, present infinitive dicāre, perfect active dicāvī, supine dicātum

  1. I dedicate, devote.
  2. I consecrate, deify.
  3. I appropriate to, devote to, assign to, set apart for.
InflectionEdit
Derived termsEdit