Last modified on 12 August 2014, at 00:15

diminutive

EnglishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

  • (abbreviation, noun, grammar): dim.

EtymologyEdit

From Middle French diminutif (1398), from Latin diminutivum, from deminuere (diminish).

PronunciationEdit

  • (UK, US) IPA(key): /dɪˈmɪn.jʊ.tɪv/, /dəˈmɪn.jə.tɪv/
  • (file)

AdjectiveEdit

diminutive (comparative more diminutive, superlative most diminutive)

  1. Very small.
    • 2011 October 20, Jamie Lillywhite, “Tottenham 1 - 0 Rubin Kazan”, BBC Sport:
      Roman Sharonov rose unchallenged to head a corner wide, while diminutive winger Gokdeniz Karadeniz ghosted in with a diving header from the edge of the six-yard box that was acrobatically kept out by Gomes.
  2. Serving to diminish.
    • Shaftesbury
      diminutive of liberty
  3. (grammar) Of or pertaining to, or creating a word form expressing smallness, youth, unimportance, or endearment.

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TranslationsEdit

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NounEdit

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Wikipedia

diminutive (plural diminutives)

  1. (grammar) A word form expressing smallness, youth, unimportance, or endearment.
    Booklet, the diminutive of book, means ‘small book’.

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Related termsEdit


DanishEdit

AdjectiveEdit

diminutive

  1. definite of diminutiv
  2. plural form of diminutiv

FrenchEdit

AdjectiveEdit

diminutive

  1. feminine form of diminutif

ItalianEdit

AdjectiveEdit

diminutive

  1. feminine plural of diminutivo