discover

See also: Discover

EnglishEdit

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 Discover on English Wikipedia

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Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old French descovrir, from Latin discooperiō, from dis- + cooperiō.

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

discover (third-person singular simple present discovers, present participle discovering, simple past and past participle discovered)

  1. (transitive, obsolete) To remove the cover from; to uncover (a head, building etc.).
  2. (transitive, now rare) To expose, uncover.
    The gust of wind discovered a bone in the sand.
  3. (transitive, chess) To create by moving a piece out of another piece's line of attack.
    This move discovers an attack on a vital pawn.
  4. (transitive, archaic) To reveal (information); to divulge, make known.
    I discovered my plans to the rest of the team.
    • Shakespeare
      Go, draw aside the curtains, and discover / The several caskets to this noble prince.
    • Francis Bacon
      Prosperity doth best discover vice; but adversity doth best discover virtue.
  5. (transitive, obsolete) To reconnoitre, explore (an area).
    • 1485, Sir Thomas Malory, Le Morte d'Arthur, Book V:
      they seyde the same, and were aggreed that Sir Clegis, Sir Claryon, and Sir Clement the noble, that they sholde dyscover the woodys, bothe the dalys and the downys.
  6. To find something for the first time.
    Turning the corner, I discovered a lovely little shop.
  7. (obsolete) To manifest without design; to show; to exhibit.
    • C. J. Smith
      The youth discovered a taste for sculpture.

SynonymsEdit

AntonymsEdit

Derived termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

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See alsoEdit

AnagramsEdit

Last modified on 27 March 2014, at 18:17