Last modified on 16 December 2014, at 02:37

discrown

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

dis- +‎ crown

VerbEdit

discrown (third-person singular simple present discrowns, present participle discrowning, simple past and past participle discrowned)

  1. To remove the crown from; thus, to deprive of royal status
    • 1876, John Esten Cooke, A Life of Gen. Robert E. Lee[1]:
      He discrowned, in rapid succession, one after another of the United States' most, accomplished and admirable commanders.
    • 1897, Hezekiah Butterworth, True to His Home[2]:
      "Never attempt to discrown the king."
    • 1917, Arnold Joseph Toynbee, Turkey= A Past and a Future[3]:
      Not, even indirectly, the discrowned Turk, for if he were not banned by his crimes he would still be doomed by his incapacity.

SynonymsEdit