discrown

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

dis- +‎ crown

VerbEdit

discrown (third-person singular simple present discrowns, present participle discrowning, simple past and past participle discrowned)

  1. To remove the crown from; thus, to deprive of royal status
    • 1876, John Esten Cooke, A Life of Gen. Robert E. Lee[1]:
      He discrowned, in rapid succession, one after another of the United States' most, accomplished and admirable commanders.
    • 1897, Hezekiah Butterworth, True to His Home[2]:
      "Never attempt to discrown the king."
    • 1917, Arnold Joseph Toynbee, Turkey= A Past and a Future[3]:
      Not, even indirectly, the discrowned Turk, for if he were not banned by his crimes he would still be doomed by his incapacity.

SynonymsEdit

Last modified on 26 September 2009, at 14:28