Last modified on 12 June 2014, at 12:14

disinter

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowing from French désenterrer.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˌdɪsɪnˈtɜː(ɹ)/

VerbEdit

disinter (third-person singular simple present disinters, present participle disinterring, simple past and past participle disinterred)

  1. To take out of the grave or tomb; to unbury; to exhume; to dig up.
  2. To bring out, as from a grave or hiding place; to bring from obscurity into view.
    • 1870, James Thomson, The City of Dreadful Night
      Why disinter dead faith from mouldering hidden?
    • 1886, Robert Louis Stevenson, Strange Case Of Dr Jekyll And Mr Hyde
      At this moment, however, the rooms bore every mark of having been recently and hurriedly ransacked; clothes lay about the floor, with their pockets inside out; lock-fast drawers stood open; and on the hearth there lay a pile of grey ashes, as though many papers had been burned. From these embers the inspector disinterred the butt end of a green cheque book, which had resisted the action of the fire.

AntonymsEdit

  • (take out of a grave): inter

TranslationsEdit

AnagramsEdit