Last modified on 24 August 2014, at 23:35

dissemble

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin dissimulare.

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

dissemble (third-person singular simple present dissembles, present participle dissembling, simple past and past participle dissembled)

  1. (transitive) To disguise or conceal something.
    • Shakespeare
      Dissemble all your griefs and discontents.
    • J. P. Kemble
      Perhaps it was right to dissemble your love.
  2. (transitive) To feign.
    • 1681, John Dryden, Absalom and Achitophel
      And like a lion, slumb'ring in the way,
      Or sleep-dissembling, while he waits his prey.
    • Tatler
      He soon dissembled a sleep.
  3. (transitive) To deliberately ignore something; to pretend not to notice.
  4. (intransitive) To falsely hide one's opinions or feelings.
    • XVII century, John Dryden, Cymon And Iphigenia; from Boccace
      While to his arms the blushing bride he took,
      To seeming sadness she composed her look;
      As if by force subjected to his will,
      Though pleased, dissembling, and a woman still.

TranslationsEdit