distorting

EnglishEdit

VerbEdit

distorting

  1. Present participle of distort.

AdjectiveEdit

distorting (comparative more distorting, superlative most distorting)

  1. That distorts.
    • 2001 Karel Jan Vollers, Twist & build: creating non-orthogonal architecture, page 86
      It's like looking in a distorting mirror at the fair.
    • 2008, House of Commons: Children, Schools and Families Committee, “Cambridge Assessment”, in Testing and Assessment: Oral and written evidence, volume 2, page 215:
      However, the procedure has been applied only to those below the threshold and who might move up, and not to those just above, who might move down. This has had a very distorting effect on the distributions.
    • 2010, Ross McKitrick, Economic Analysis of Environmental Policy, page 187:
      This is somewhat counter-intuitive, and indeed goes against the double-dividend argument that in economies with very distorting tax systems we should raise pollution taxes and lower other taxes.

TranslationsEdit

Last modified on 9 December 2013, at 09:00