Last modified on 24 August 2014, at 23:34

divine

EnglishEdit

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PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Old French divin, from Latin dīvīnus, from divus (god).

AdjectiveEdit

divine (comparative more divine, superlative most divine)

  1. of or pertaining to a god
  2. eternal, holy, or otherwise godlike.
  3. of superhuman or surpassing excellence
  4. beautiful, heavenly
  5. (obsolete) foreboding; prescient
    • Milton
      Yet oft his heart, divine of something ill, / Misgave him.
  6. Relating to divinity or theology.
    • South
      church history and other divine learning
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TranslationsEdit
The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Help:How to check translations.

NounEdit

divine (plural divines)

  1. One skilled in divinity; a theologian.
    • Denham
      Poets were the first divines.
  2. A minister of the gospel; a priest; a clergyman.
    • J. Woodbridge
      The first divines of New England were surpassed by none in extensive erudition.
  3. (often capitalized, with 'the') God or a god, particularly in its aspect as a transcendental concept
SynonymsEdit
Derived termsEdit
TranslationsEdit
The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Help:How to check translations.

Etymology 2Edit

From Middle French deviner, from Latin divino.

VerbEdit

divine (third-person singular simple present divines, present participle divining, simple past and past participle divined)

  1. (transitive) to foretell (something), especially by the use of divination
    • Bancroft
      a sagacity which divined the evil designs
    • Shakespeare
      Darest thou [] divine his downfall?
  2. (transitive) to guess (something)
  3. (transitive) to search for (underground objects or water) using a divining rod
  4. To render divine; to deify.
    • Spenser
      Living on earth like angel new divined.
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FrenchEdit

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

divine

  1. feminine form of divin

ItalianEdit

AdjectiveEdit

divine

  1. feminine plural of divino

LatinEdit

EtymologyEdit

From dīvīnus (of divine origin)

AdverbEdit

dīvīnē (comparative dīvīnius, superlative dīvīnissimē)

  1. prophetically, by divine inspiration
  2. divinely, admirably

SynonymsEdit

Related termsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  • Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, 1st edition. (Oxford University Press)