Last modified on 27 March 2014, at 18:28

dobber

EnglishEdit

NounEdit

dobber (plural dobbers)

  1. (US) A tool used to play bingo; a dauber.
  2. (UK, derogatory) A member of the working class in Scotland who is seen as undereducated, with poor taste, especially in clothes, and poor social skills; closely connected to chav.
  3. (Australia, UK, derogatory) One who dobs (informs against or implicates to authority).
    Nikki is such a dobber, she told the teacher that I hit Karen in the playground.
    • 1999, William De Maria, Deadly Disclosures: Whistleblowing and the Ethical Meltdown of Australia, page 16,
      In awakening us to our powerlessness, whistleblowers produce all sorts of crisscrossed emotions. Should we respond to them as truth-bearing ethical citizens, or spiteful, griping dobbers?
    • 2010, Lisa Heidke, What Kate Did Next, page 125,
      ‘Not only that,’ Graeme continued, ‘but Simone′s a dobber – and no-one likes a dobber, do they, K? []
    • 2011, James Morton, Susanna Lobez, Gangland Melbourne, page 95,
      The question was whether the dobber had simply dobbed or whether he had planted the weapons.
  4. (UK, informal) Any small electronic device that plugs directly into a larger one, such as a wireless scoring system in fencing or a USB mass storage device.
  5. (UK, chiefly dialect) A large marble.
  6. (US, regional) A float (as used by an angler).
    • 2007, William G. Tapply, Trout Eyes: True Tales of Adventure, Travel, and Fly-Fishing, page 191,
      In attaching this dobber or float, tie it on as short a tippet as you can manage and attach it to the leader from four to six feet above the nymph.
  7. A dabchick.

AnagramsEdit


DutchEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • (file)
  • Hyphenation: dob‧ber

NounEdit

dobber m (plural dobbers, diminutive dobbertje n)

  1. float (used when fishing)

Derived termsEdit