Last modified on 24 May 2014, at 16:18

docetism

EnglishEdit

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EtymologyEdit

From Latin Docetae, Docetæ +‎ -ism, from Ancient Greek doketai "phantasmists", coined 197–203 CE by Serapion of Antioch, from δοκέω (dokéō, I seem), δόκησις (dókēsis, apparition, phantom). Related to latter component of synecdoche.

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NounEdit

docetism (countable and uncountable, plural docetisms)

  1. (Christianity) The doctrine of the Docetes, that Jesus only appeared to have a physical body and was ultimately of celestial substance.
    • 2009, Diarmaid MacCulloch, A History of Christianity, Penguin 2010, p. 124:
      His Passion and Resurrection in history were therefore not fleshly events, even if they seemed so; they were heavenly play-acting (the doctrine known as Docetism, from the Greek verb dokein, ‘to seem’).

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