Last modified on 15 August 2013, at 12:22

dominie

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Alteration of domine, with spelling changed to reflect pronunciation.

NounEdit

dominie (plural dominies)

  1. (now chiefly Scotland) A schoolmaster, teacher.
    • 1876, Mark Twain, The Adventures of Tom Sawyer, XXI:
      the sign-painter's boy said that when the dominie had reached the proper condition on Examination Evening he would "manage the thing".
    • 1932, Lewis Grassic Gibbon, Sunset Song, Polygon 2006 (A Scots Quair), p. 24:
      when it was time for the Strachan bairns to pass the end of the Cuddiestoun road on their way to school down there she was waiting and gave the paper to the eldest, the quean Marget, and told her to show it to the Dominie and ask him what it might mean.
  2. (US) A pastor of the Dutch Reformed Church.

ScotsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin domine, vocative singular of dominus (lord", "sir", "head of household); from domus (house) + -inus.

NounEdit

dominie (plural dominies)

  1. schoolmaster, teacher