Last modified on 9 August 2014, at 17:09

downcast

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

down +‎ cast

AdjectiveEdit

downcast (comparative more downcast, superlative most downcast)

  1. (of eyes) Looking downwards.
    • Dryden
      'Tis love, said she; and then my downcast eyes, / And guilty dumbness, witnessed my surprise.
  2. (of a person) Feeling despondent.

TranslationsEdit

NounEdit

downcast (plural downcasts)

  1. (computing) A cast from supertype to subtype.
  2. (obsolete) A melancholy look.
    • Beaumont and Fletcher
      That downcast of thine eye.
  3. (mining) A ventilating shaft down which the air passes in circulating through a mine.

VerbEdit

downcast (third-person singular simple present downcasts, present participle downcasting, simple past and past participle downcast or downcasted)

  1. (transitive, obsolete) To cast or throw up; to turn upward.
  2. (transitive, Scotland) To taunt; to reproach; to upbraid.
  3. (transitive, computing) To cast from supertype to subtype.