Last modified on 13 June 2014, at 16:57

draco

See also: Draco

LatinEdit

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Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Ancient Greek δράκων (drákōn, dragon).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

dracō m (genitive dracōnis); third declension

  1. A dragon; a kind of snake or serpent.
  2. The standard of a Roman cohort, shaped like an Egyptian crocodile ('dragon') head.
  3. The astronomical constellation Draco.
  4. (ecclesiastic) The Devil.

Usage notesEdit

Draco usually connoted larger sorts of snakes in Classical usage, particularly those which seemed exotic to the Romans. One traditional rule gives the distinction among the various Latin synonyms as anguis being a water snake; draco being a "temple" snake, the sort of large, exotic snake associated with the guardianship of temples; and serpens being a common terrestrial snake. This rule is not universally credited, however.[1]

InflectionEdit

Third declension.

Number Singular Plural
nominative dracō dracōnēs
genitive dracōnis dracōnum
dative dracōnī dracōnibus
accusative dracōnem dracōnēs
ablative dracōne dracōnibus
vocative dracō dracōnēs

Derived termsEdit

DescendantsEdit

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ James Fergusson, Tree and serpent Worship, or illustrations of mythology and art in India in the 1st and 4th cent. a. Chr, London: Allen and Co.,1868, page 13 (note).