Last modified on 30 October 2014, at 23:29

EnglishEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Middle English dreen, dreghen, dreogen, from Old English drēogan (to do, work, perform, fulfill, take part in, conduct, lead a (certain) life, pass life, fight, wander, commit, perpetrate, do battle, wage war, experience, bear, suffer, endure, sustain, tolerate, act, labor, enjoy, be employed, be busy), from Proto-Germanic *dreuganą (to work, act, do military service), from Proto-Indo-European *dhereugh- (to hold fast), from Proto-Indo-European *dher- (to hold, hold fast, support). Cognate with Scots dree, drie (to endure, thole, suffer, bear), Gothic [script needed] (driugan, to do military service), Icelandic drýgja (to commit, connect, perpetrate, lengthen). See also dright, drighten.

VerbEdit

dree (third-person singular simple present drees, present participle dreeing, simple past and past participle dreed)

  1. (transitive) To suffer; bear; thole; endure; put up with; undergo.
    • 1885: And redoubled pine for its dwellers I dree — Richard F. Burton, The Book of the Thousand Nights and a Night (Volume 8)
  2. (intransitive) To endure; brook; be able to do or continue.
Derived termsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From Middle English dreȝ, dregh, dryȝ (long, extended, great), from Old English *drēog (fit, sober, earnest) and/or Old Norse drjúgr (extensive, sufficient); both from Proto-Germanic *dreugaz (extensive, firm), from Proto-Indo-European *dhereugh- (to hold fast), from Proto-Indo-European *dher- (to hold, hold fast, support). Cognate with Scots dreich (extensive, lasting, long-lasting, tedious, tiresome, slow), West Frisian drege (extensive, long-lasting), Danish drøj (tough, solid, heavy), Swedish dryg (lasting, liberal, hard, large, ample), Icelandic drjúgur (long, substantial, ample, heavy).

Alternative formsEdit

AdjectiveEdit

dree (comparative more dree, superlative most dree)

  1. (Now chiefly dialectal) Long; large; ample; great.
  2. (Now chiefly dialectal) Great; of serious moment.
  3. (Now chiefly dialectal) Tedious; wearisome; tiresome.
Derived termsEdit

Etymology 3Edit

From Middle English dreghe, dregh, from dregh, dreȝ (long, extended, great). See above.

NounEdit

dree (plural drees)

  1. (Now chiefly dialectal) Length; extension; the longest part.

AnagramsEdit


LuxembourgishEdit

VerbEdit

dree

  1. second-person singular imperative of dreeën

ScotsEdit

EtymologyEdit

Old English drēogan.

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

tae dree (third-person singular simple present drees, present participle dreein, simple past dreed, past participle dreed)

  1. to endure, suffer, put up with, undergo

Derived termsEdit