Last modified on 31 May 2014, at 19:32

dright

EnglishEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Middle English drihte, from Old English driht, dryht (a multitude, an army, company, body of retainers, nation, a people, men), from Proto-Germanic *druhtiz (troop, following), from Proto-Indo-European *dhereugh-, *dher- (to hold, hold fast, support). Cognate with North Frisian dregte (people, crowd, escort, retinue, host), Middle Low German drucht (band, war-team), Middle High German truht (multitude, offspring), Icelandic drótt (people, entourage, bodyguard), Gothic [script needed] (gadrauhts, soldier).

NounEdit

dright (plural drights)

  1. (obsolete) A multitude; army; host.
Derived termsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From Middle English dright, driȝt, earlier drihten, from Old English dryhten (a ruler, king, lord, prince, the supreme ruler, the Lord, God, Christ), from Proto-Germanic *druhtinaz (leader, chief, lord), from Proto-Indo-European *dhereugh-, *dher- (to hold, hold fast, support). Cognate with Scots drichtin, drichtine (lord, the Lord), Old Frisian drochten (lord), Old Saxon drohtin (lord), Middle High German truhten, trohten (ruler, lord), Danish drot (king), Swedish drotten, drott (king, ruler, sovereign), Icelandic drottinn (lord, master, ruler, God). Related also to Old English dryht (a multitude, an army, company, body of retainers, nation, a people, men), Old English ġedryht (fortune, fate), Old English drēogan (to serve in the military, endure). More at dree.

Alternative formsEdit

NounEdit

dright (plural drights)

  1. Alternative form of drighten
  2. A lord; ruler; chief; leader.
    • 2001, Diana Wynne Jones, The chronicles of Chrestomanci:
      "Hey, you!" Christopher called out in the most lordly way he could. "You there! Take me to the Dright at once!"
  3. (often capitalised) The Lord; The Lord God; Christ.
Derived termsEdit