durable

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle English, from Old French, from Latin dūrābilis (lasting, permanent), from dūrō (harden, make hard).

AdjectiveEdit

durable (comparative more durable, superlative most durable)

  1. Able to resist wear, decay; lasting; enduring.

SynonymsEdit

AntonymsEdit

TranslationsEdit

NounEdit

durable (plural durables)

  1. (economics) A durable good, one useful over more than one period, especially a year.
    • 1989, Robert A. Pollak, , page 188:
      In a frictionless world with perfect rental markets, there is an unambiguous cost associated with the use of a durable for a single period.

TranslationsEdit

AntonymsEdit


AsturianEdit

AdjectiveEdit

durable (epicene, plural durables)

  1. durable (able to resist wear; enduring)

FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin dūrābilis.

AdjectiveEdit

durable (masculine and feminine, plural durables)

  1. durable
  2. sustainable

Related termsEdit


SpanishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin dūrābilis.

AdjectiveEdit

durable m, f (plural durables)

  1. durable

SynonymsEdit

Last modified on 9 April 2014, at 09:23