eccentric

EnglishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle French excentrique, from Medieval Latin excentricus, from Ancient Greek ἔκκεντρος (ekkentros, not having the earth as the center of an orbit), from ἐκ (ek, out) + κέντρον (kentron, point)

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

eccentric (comparative more eccentric, superlative most eccentric)

  1. not at or in the centre.
  2. not perfectly circular.
    an eccentric or elliptical orbit
  3. having a different center; not concentric.
  4. (of a person) deviating from the norm; behaving unexpectedly or differently.
    "The recluse has become really eccentric over the years."
  5. (physiology) (of a motion) against or in the opposite direction of contraction of a muscle. (E.g. flexion of the lower arm (bending of the elbow joint) by an external force while contracting the triceps and other elbow extensor muscles to control that movement; opening of the jaw while flexing the masseter).
    Antonym: concentric. Both concentric and eccentric are collectively referred to as isotonic, the antonym of which is isometric.
  6. Not having the same goal or motive.
    • Francis Bacon
      his own ends, which must needs be often eccentric to those of his master

SynonymsEdit

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QuotationsEdit

  • 1956Arthur C. Clarke, The City and the Stars, p. 40
    Khedron was the only other person in the city who could be called eccentric.

TranslationsEdit

NounEdit

eccentric (plural eccentrics)

  1. One who does not behave like others.
  2. A disk or wheel with its axis off centre, giving a reciprocating motion.
  3. (slang) A kook.

TranslationsEdit

Last modified on 9 April 2014, at 10:04