Last modified on 5 October 2014, at 18:04
See also: ef-, -ef, and EF

EnglishEdit

NounEdit

ef (plural efs)

  1. The name of the Latin-script letter F/f.

See alsoEdit

Derived termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

AnagramsEdit


HungarianEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

ef

  1. The name of the Latin-script letter F/f.

IcelandicEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Norse ef, from Proto-Germanic *jabai.

PronunciationEdit

ConjunctionEdit

ef

  1. if

LatinEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

ef (indeclinable)

  1. The name of the letter F.

Usage notesEdit

  • Multiple Latin names for the letter F, f have been suggested. The most common is ef or a syllabic f, although there is some evidence which also supports, as names for the letter, , əf, , and even (in the fourth- or fifth-century first Antinoë papyrus, which gives Greek transliterations of the Latin names of the Roman alphabet’s letters) ιφφε (iphphe).

Coordinate termsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  • Arthur E. Gordon, The Letter Names of the Latin Alphabet (University of California Press, 1973; volume 9 of University of California Publications: Classical Studies), especially pages 30–31, 42–44, and 63

LatvianEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

ef m (invariable)

  1. The Latvian name of the Latin script letter F/f.

See alsoEdit


Old FrenchEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin apem, accusative singular of apis.

NounEdit

ef m (oblique plural es, nominative singular es, nominative plural ef)

  1. bee

ReferencesEdit


Old SaxonEdit

ConjunctionEdit

ef

  1. if, when

WelshEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Indo-European *éy.

PronunciationEdit

PronounEdit

ef

  1. he; him.

Usage notesEdit

Ef is primarily a feature of Literary Welsh. Colloquial Welsh uses e or o instead.