Last modified on 7 December 2014, at 17:51

elbow

EnglishEdit

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an elbow

EtymologyEdit

From Middle English elbowe, from Old English elboga, elnboga (elbow), from Proto-Germanic *alinabugô (elbow), equivalent to ell +‎ bow. Cognate with Scots elbuck (elbow), Saterland Frisian Älbooge (elbow), Dutch elleboog (elbow), Low German Ellebage (elbow), German Ellbogen, Ellenbogen (elbow), Danish albue (elbow), Icelandic olbogi, olnbogi (elbow).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

elbow (plural elbows)

  1. The joint between the upper arm and the forearm.
    • R. of Gloucester
      her arms to the elbows naked
  2. Any turn or bend like that of the elbow, in a wall, building, coastline, etc.; an angular or jointed part of any structure, such as the raised arm of a chair or sofa, or a short pipe fitting, turning at an angle or bent.
    the sides of windows, where the jamb makes an elbow with the window back
  3. (US, obsolete, early 20th-century slang) A detective.
    • 1924, Dashiell Hammett, "Zigzags of Treachery":
      "An elbow, huh?" putting all the contempt he could in his voice; and somehow any synonym for detective seems able to hold a lot of contempt.
  4. (basketball) Part of a basketball court located at the intersection of the free-throw line and the free-throw lane.[1]

Derived termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

VerbEdit

elbow (third-person singular simple present elbows, present participle elbowing, simple past and past participle elbowed)

  1. To push with the elbow; to jostle or force.
    He elbowed his way through the crowd.

TranslationsEdit

See alsoEdit

AnagramsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Newell, Pete; Nater, Swen (2008). Pete Newell's Playing Big. Human Kinetics. p. 26. ISBN 9780736068093. Retrieved April 11, 2013.