embase

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From em- +‎ base. Compare Old French embaissier.

VerbEdit

embase (third-person singular simple present embases, present participle embasing, simple past and past participle embased)

  1. (obsolete) Physically to lower.
    Embased the valleys, and embossed the hills. — Sylvester.
  2. (obsolete, transitive) To bring down or lower in position, status, etc.; to degrade, humiliate.
    • 1590, Edmund Spenser, The Faerie Queene, III.1:
      And either vowd with all their power and witt / To let not others honour be defaste / Of friend or foe, who ever it embaste [...].
    Such pitiful embellishments of speech as serve for nothing but to embase divinity. — South.
  3. (obsolete) To lower the value of (a coin, commodity etc.); to debase (a coin) with alloy.
    Alloy in coin of gold [] may make the metal work the better, but it embaseth it. — Francis Bacon.
Last modified on 4 March 2014, at 04:44