See also: -eme and ëmë

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Middle English eam, eme (uncle), from Old English ēam (uncle). See eam.

Alternative formsEdit

NounEdit

eme (plural emes)

  1. (obsolete except Scotland) An uncle.
    • 1485, Sir Thomas Malory, Le Morte Darthur, Book VIII:
      So aftir this yonge Trystrames rode unto his eme, Kynge Marke of Cornwayle, and whan he com there he herde sey that there wolde no knyght fyght with Sir Marhalt.
    • 1590, Edmund Spenser, The Faerie Queene, II.x:
      Whilst they were young, Cassibalane their Eme / Was by the people chosen in their sted [...].
  2. (Scotland) friend.

Related termsEdit

AnagramsEdit


BasqueEdit

NounEdit

eme

  1. female

HungarianEdit

EtymologyEdit

em (variation of íme) +‎ e

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˈɛmɛ/
  • Hyphenation: eme

PronounEdit

eme

  1. (archaic, poetic) this
    • 1846: Petőfi Sándor, Egy gondolat bánt engemet...
      És a zászlókon eme szent jelszóval: - (And on the flags with this holy word:)
      „Világszabadság!” - (World freedom!)

Usage notesEdit

A rarer substitute of ez, but unlike ez, it does not take the case of the noun it is attached to, and no definite article is used:

ezen a helyen - eme helyen (at this place)
ebben a házban - eme házban (in this house)

Use eme before words beginning with consonants. Use emez before words beginning with vowels.

SynonymsEdit


ItalianEdit

Italian Wikipedia has an article on:

Wikipedia it

NounEdit

eme m (plural emi)

  1. (biochemistry) heme

LatinEdit

VerbEdit

eme

  1. Second-person singular present active imperative of emō

PortugueseEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

eme m (plural emes)

  1. The name of the letter m

ScotsEdit

EtymologyEdit

Middle English eem, from Old English ēam, from Proto-Germanic *auhaimaz (maternal uncle), related to Latin avus (grandfather). Cognate with Dutch oom, German Ohm, Oheim. More at eam.

NounEdit

eme (plural emes)

  1. uncle
  2. friend

SpanishEdit

NounEdit

eme f (plural emes)

  1. Name of the letter m.

TacanaEdit

NounEdit

eme

  1. hand
Last modified on 9 February 2014, at 14:57