empeachment

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

empeach +‎ -ment

NounEdit

empeachment (plural empeachments)

  1. Obsolete form of impeachment.
    • 1530, Edward Foxe quoted in, The History of the Reformation of the Church of England, Book II., page #85:
      PLeaſeth in your Highneſs to be advertiſed, That arriving here at Cotton Cambridg upon Satury laſt paſt at noon, that ſame night, and Sunday in the Morning, we deviſed with the Vice‐chancellour, and ſuch other as favoureth your Grace’s Cauſe, how and in what ſort to compaſs and attain your Grace’s Purpoſe and Intent ; wherein we aſſure your Grace, we found much towardneſs, good will, and diligence, in the Vice‐Chancellour and Dr. Edmunds, being as ſtudious to ſerve your Grace as we could wiſh or deſire : Nevertheleſs there was no ſo much care, labour, ſtudy, and diligence employed on our Party, by them, our ſelf, and other, for attaining your Grace’s Purpoſe, but threr was as much done by others for the lett and empeachment of the ſame ; and as we aſſembled they aſſembled, as we made Friends they made Friends, to lett that nothing ſhould paſs as in the Univerſities Names ; wherein the firſt day they were Superiors, for they had put in the ears of them, by whoſe Voices ſuch things do paſs, multas fabulas, to tedious to write unto your Grace.
Last modified on 13 October 2011, at 04:45