Last modified on 17 July 2014, at 15:49

employe

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From French employé.

NounEdit

employe (plural employes)

  1. Alternative spelling of employee
    • 1920, Conference proceedings of the National Electric Light Association Convention, National Independent Meat Packers Association, the University of Georgia College of Agriculture, page 103:
      For that clerk, in the eyes of the people who come to you for service, is not merely an employe.
    • 1935, Education Digest, page 16:
      As soon as a qualified substitute can be obtained, he should, upon the request of an employe, recommend him for release from his contract.
    • 1922, Lila Bell Acheson Wallace and De Witt Wallace, The Readers Digest, The Readers Digest Association, page 86:
      Bring the same relationship we used to enjoy in the firm of 50 years ago when the employe used to kick the boss's door open and say: 'Joe, I just discovered [...]'.
    • 1859, Transactions of the Gulf Coast Association of Geological Societies, the Chicago Homeopathic Medical Society, page 156:
      In his endeavor to justify a radical action, the employe often carries his grievance so far that an element of the ridiculous enters into his arguments [...].