Last modified on 16 December 2014, at 04:05

enact

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle English enacten, from en-, from Old French en- (to cause to be), from Latin in- (in) and Old French acte (perform, do), from Latin actum, past participle of ago (set in motion)

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

enact (third-person singular simple present enacts, present participle enacting, simple past and past participle enacted)

  1. (transitive, law) to make (a bill) into law
  2. (transitive) to act the part of; to play
    • Shakespeare
      I did enact Julius Caesar.
  3. (transitive) to do; to effect
    • Shakespeare
      The king enacts more wonders than a man.

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

NounEdit

enact

  1. (obsolete) purpose; determination

Part or all of this entry has been imported from the 1913 edition of Webster’s Dictionary, which is now free of copyright and hence in the public domain. The imported definitions may be significantly out of date, and any more recent senses may be completely missing.