Last modified on 8 July 2014, at 10:15

entelechy

EnglishEdit

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EtymologyEdit

From Late Latin entelechia, from Ancient Greek ἐντελέχεια (entelékheia), coined by Aristotle from ἐντελής (entelḗs, complete, finished, perfect) (from τέλος (télos, end, fruition, accomplishment)) + ἔχω (ékhō, to have)

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

entelechy (plural entelechies)

  1. (Aristotelian philosophy) The complete realisation and final form of some potential concept or function; the conditions under which a potential thing becomes actualised.
    • 1603, John Florio, translating Michel de Montaigne, Essays, II.12:
      Aristotle [...] calleth it [the soul] Entelechy, or perfection moving of it selfe (as cold an invention as any other) for he neither speaketh of the essence, nor of the beginning, nor of the soules nature; but onely noteth the effects of it [...].
  2. A particular type of motivation, need for self-determination, and inner strength directing life and growth to become all one is capable of being. It is the need to actualize one’s beliefs. It is having a personal vision and being able to actualize that vision from within.
  3. Something complex that emerges when a large number of simple objects are put together.

TranslationsEdit

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