Last modified on 16 December 2014, at 14:55

fascine

See also: fasciné

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From the French fascine, from the Latin fascīna (bundle of sticks).

NounEdit

fascine (plural fascines)

  1. (fortification) A cylindrical bundle of small sticks of wood, bound together, used in raising batteries, filling ditches, strengthening ramparts, and making parapets; also in revetments for river banks, and in mats for dams, jetties, etc.
    • 1786, Francis Grose, A Treatise on Ancient Armour and Weapons, page 51.:
      Halberts differ very little from the bill, being like them constructed both for pushing and cutting: a halbert consists of three parts, the spear, or sometimes a kind of sword blade for pushing, an ax, or hatchet for striking and cutting, and a flook or hook for pulling down fascines, in the attack of trenches, or temporary fortifications.

See alsoEdit

AnagramsEdit


FrenchEdit

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

fascine

  1. first-person singular present indicative of fasciner
  2. third-person singular present indicative of fasciner
  3. first-person singular present subjunctive of fasciner
  4. third-person singular present subjunctive of fasciner
  5. second-person singular imperative of fasciner

AnagramsEdit


ItalianEdit

NounEdit

fascine f

  1. plural form of fascina

AnagramsEdit


SpanishEdit

VerbEdit

fascine

  1. Formal second-person singular (usted) imperative form of fascinar.
  2. First-person singular (yo) present subjunctive form of fascinar.
  3. Formal second-person singular (usted) present subjunctive form of fascinar.
  4. Third-person singular (él, ella, also used with usted?) present subjunctive form of fascinar.