Last modified on 4 December 2014, at 15:15

faux

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowing from French faux.

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

faux (not comparable)

  1. Fake or artificial
    clothing made from faux leather
    a faux-archaic style of speech
    faux wine

AntonymsEdit

TranslationsEdit

Derived termsEdit


FrenchEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Old French fauz, faus from Latin falsus

AdjectiveEdit

faux m (feminine fausse, masculine plural faux, feminine plural fausses)

  1. false; untrue
  2. false; not real
AntonymsEdit

AdverbEdit

faux

  1. badly; inaccurately; untruly

Etymology 2Edit

From Latin falx.

NounEdit

faux f (plural faux)

  1. scythe

See alsoEdit

See alsoEdit

External linksEdit


JèrriaisEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Old French faulz, the plural of fault, ultimately from Latin falsus.

AdjectiveEdit

faux m (feminine fausse, masculine plural faux, feminine plural fausses)

  1. false
Derived termsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From Latin falx, from Proto-Indo-European *dhalk-, *dhalg- (a cutting tool).

NounEdit

faux f (plural faux)

  1. scythe

LatinEdit

EtymologyEdit

Etymology unknown. See also fauces.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

faux f (genitive faucis); third declension

  1. throat, gullet
  2. chasm

InflectionEdit

Third declension i-stem, alternative accusative singular in -im and ablative singular in .

Number Singular Plural
nominative faux faucēs
genitive faucis faucium
dative faucī faucibus
accusative faucim
faucem
faucīs
faucēs
ablative faucī
fauce
faucibus
vocative faux faucēs

Derived termsEdit

DescendantsEdit


Middle FrenchEdit

AdjectiveEdit

faux m (feminine singular fauce, masculine plural faux, feminine plural fauces)

  1. Alternative form of faulx