Last modified on 13 January 2014, at 03:49

feets

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

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NounEdit

feets

  1. (dialect) plural form of foot
    Feets, don't fail me now.
    • 1894, Al Thayer, Ah there: Pickings from Lobby chatter in the Cincinnati Enquirer, page 71:
      Last Sunday she said to Mr. Baker: "Ach, Gott, Mr. Baker, my feets is killing me. I must go me by a feets doctor."
    • 1896, Stephen Crane, Maggie: A Girl of the Streets:
      "I kin remember when she weared worsted boots an' her two feets was no bigger dan yer tumb an' she weared worsted boots, Miss Smith," she cried, raising her streaming eyes.
    • 1968, Taj Mahal, “Good Morning Miss Brown” (song)[1], in The Natch'l Blues (album): 
      Good morning Miss Brown / Mamma how do you do? / I said good morning Miss Brown / Mamma how do you do? / She say I'm feelin' fine and lookin' good / Maaan what about you? / I say I got the misery and the back ache baby / And my feets hurtin' me when I walk / You know I got the misery and the back ache baby / And my feets hurtin' me when I walk / And you know too much conversation hurt my tongue to talk