Last modified on 23 August 2014, at 13:33

ferme

See also: fermés

EnglishEdit

NounEdit

ferme (plural fermes)

  1. (cant) Hole.

ReferencesEdit

  • OED2
  • 1811 Dictionary of the Vulgar Tongue

FrenchEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Middle French, from Old French ferm, ferme (solid), from Latin firmus (solid, secure), from Proto-Indo-European *dher(ə)-, *dhrē- (to hold).

AdjectiveEdit

ferme (masculine and feminine, plural fermes)

  1. firm
SynonymsEdit

NounEdit

ferme f (plural fermes)

  1. (carpentry) roof truss

VerbEdit

ferme

  1. first-person singular indicative present form of fermer
  2. third-person singular indicative present form of fermer
  3. first-person singular subjunctive present form of fermer
  4. third-person singular subjunctive present form of fermer
  5. second-person singular imperative of fermer

Etymology 2Edit

From Middle French ferme (farm, farm buildings), from Old French ferme (lease for working, rent, farm), from Medieval Latin ferma, firma (rent, tax, tribute, farm), from Old English feorm (rent, provision, supplies, feast), from Proto-Germanic *firmō, *firhuma- (means of living, subsistence), from Proto-Germanic *firhu- (life force, body, being), from Proto-Indo-European *perkʷ- (life, force, strength, tree). Related to Old English feorh (life, spirit), Gothic 𐍆𐌰𐌹𐍂𐍈𐌿𐍃 (fairƕus, the world). Compare also Old English feormehām (farm), feormere (purveyor).

NounEdit

ferme f (plural fermes)

  1. farm
Derived termsEdit

External linksEdit


ItalianEdit

AdjectiveEdit

ferme

  1. feminine plural of fermo

NounEdit

ferme f pl

  1. plural form of ferma

AnagramsEdit


LatinEdit

EtymologyEdit

From *ferimē, earlier superlative of ferē, ultimately from Proto-Indo-European *dʰer- (to hold), whence also firmus.

AdverbEdit

fermē (not comparable)

  1. Closely, quite, entirely, fully, altogether, just.
  2. In general, generally, usually, commonly, for most of the time.

ReferencesEdit

  • ferme in Charlton T. Lewis & Charles Short, A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1879

Middle FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old French ferm, ferme (solid), from Latin firmus (solid, secure), from Proto-Indo-European *dher(ə)-, *dhrē- (to hold).

AdjectiveEdit

ferme m, f (plural fermes)

  1. firm

NovialEdit

NounEdit

ferme (plural fermes)

  1. farm

Old FrenchEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From Medieval Latin ferma, firma (rent, tax, tribute, farm), from Old English feorm (rent, provision, supplies, feast), from Proto-Germanic *firmō, *firhuma- (means of living, subsistence), from Proto-Germanic *firhu- (life force, body, being), from Proto-Indo-European *perkʷ- (life, force, strength, tree).

NounEdit

ferme f (oblique plural fermes, nominative singular ferme, nominative plural fermes)

  1. lease (letting agreement)
  2. the land leased
  3. farm

AdjectiveEdit

ferme f

  1. oblique feminine singular of ferm
  2. nominative feminine singular of ferm