Last modified on 31 May 2014, at 20:21

finochie

EnglishEdit

NounEdit

finochie (plural not attested)

  1. obsolete spelling of finocchio
    • 1733, Practical Huſbandman and Planter, volume 1, pages 139 and 185
      The Finochi, or Finochio of the Italians, and which, from a literal Termination generally put to Engliſh Words, I call Finochie, is a Kind of Fennel; which when tied up, and blanched a little, is one of the wholſomeſt Aromaticks that any Body can eat, (but is withal a little two ſtrong for ſome Palates,) yet is in great Requeſt amongſt Valetudinarians, or thoſe who endeavour after Health and long Life.
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      Once a Week, or Fortnight, or thereabout, alſo ought the Gardener to be putting in a few Finochie-Seeds; and to be tranſplanting out thoſe Cauliflore, Brocaulie, Borecaule, and Savoy Plants, with which the Tables of the Curious are to be furniſh’d between Michaelmas and Chriſtmas.
    • 1868, William Nathaniel White, J. Van Buren, James Camak, Gardening for the South, page 328:
      Fennel is a good deal used, in continental Europe, in soups, fish-sauces, garnishes, and salads. It is also considerably used in England, but less with us. The Italians blanch and eat the stalks of one variety called Finochie, like celery.