Last modified on 23 July 2014, at 10:53

flavour

EnglishEdit

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Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle English meaning "smell, odor", usually pleasing, from Old French flaour (smell, odor), from Vulgar Latin flator (odor, that which blows), from Latin flator (blower), from flare (to blow, puff)

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

flavour (plural flavours) (British)

  1. The quality produced by the sensation of taste or, especially, of taste and smell in combined effect.
    The flavour of this apple pie is delicious.
  2. A substance used to produce a taste. Flavouring.
    Flavour was added to the pudding.
  3. A variety (of taste) attributed to an object.
    What flavour of bubble gum do you enjoy?
  4. The characteristic quality of something.
    the flavour of an experience
  5. (informal) A kind or type.
    Debian is one flavour of the Linux operating system.
  6. (physics) One of the six types of quarks (top, bottom, strange, charmed, up, and down) or three types of leptons (electron, muon, and tauon).
  7. (archaic) The quality produced by the sensation of smell; odour; fragrance.
    the flavour of a rose

TranslationsEdit

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VerbEdit

flavour (third-person singular simple present flavours, present participle flavouring, simple past and past participle flavoured)

  1. (transitive) To add flavouring to something.

TranslationsEdit

Derived termsEdit

See alsoEdit