Last modified on 7 December 2014, at 03:27

forban

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle English forbannen, equivalent to for- +‎ ban.

VerbEdit

forban (third-person singular simple present forbans, present participle forbanning, simple past and past participle forbanned)

  1. (transitive) To exile; banish.
    • 2013, Daniel Lord Smail, The Consumption of Justice:
      Kenneth Meredith has noted that the coutumiers of northern France "usually called for the confiscation of the property of both executed criminals and persons who had been forbanned."

FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle French fourban, from Old French forsban, forban (pirate, privateer, banishment), deverbal of Old French forbenir (to banish, to exile), from Frankish furbannjan, *firbannjan (to ban, banish), from Proto-Germanic *fra- + Proto-Germanic *bannijaną (to request, damn, curse), from Proto-Indo-European *bhā- (to say, pronounce). Cognate with Dutch verbannen (to outcast, banish, exile), German verbannen (to banish, exile), Norwegian forbanne (to curse). More at for-, ban.

NounEdit

forban m (plural forbans)

  1. (archaic) pirate
  2. rogue, scoundrel; an unscrupulous individual capable of any wrongdoing

SynonymsEdit

External linksEdit


Old FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

Deverbal of forbenir.

NounEdit

forban m (oblique plural forbans, nominative singular forbans, nominative plural forban)

  1. banishment (state of being banished)

ReferencesEdit