Last modified on 28 September 2014, at 20:00
See also: Ford, FORD, -ford, and förd

EnglishEdit

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Alternative formsEdit

  • foorth (obsolete, [14th century])

EtymologyEdit

From Old English ford, from Proto-Germanic *furduz, from Proto-Indo-European *pértus (crossing). Cognate with English firth, fjord (via Old Norse), German Furt, and more distantly with port (via Latin).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

ford (plural fords)

  1. A location where a stream is shallow and the bottom has good footing, making it possible to cross from one side to the other with no bridge, by walking, riding, or driving through the water; a crossing.
    • Sir Walter Scott
      He swam the Esk river where ford there was none.
  2. A stream; a current.
    • Spenser
      With water of the ford / Or of the clouds.
    • Dryden
      Permit my ghost to pass the Stygian ford.

TranslationsEdit

VerbEdit

ford (third-person singular simple present fords, present participle fording, simple past and past participle forded)

  1. To cross a stream using a ford.

TranslationsEdit


Old EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Germanic *furduz (crossing, ford), from Proto-Indo-European *pr̥téw-, the oblique stem of Proto-Indo-European *pértus, from *per- (to ferry, put across). Cognate with Old Saxon ford (ford). More at fare.

NounEdit

ford m

  1. ford.
  2. waterway.

DeclensionEdit

DescendantsEdit