Last modified on 15 July 2014, at 04:56

foreward

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

fore +‎ -ward

NounEdit

foreward (plural forewards)

  1. (obsolete) An advance group; the vanguard.

AdverbEdit

foreward

  1. Misspelling of forward.

AnagramsEdit


Middle EnglishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old English foreweard, foreward (condition, bargain, agreement, contract, treaty, assurance), equivalent to fore- +‎ ward (ward, keeping). Liken Dutch voorwaarde (condition, terms, proviso, stipulation). More at fore-, ward.

NounEdit

foreward (plural forewards)

  1. agreement, contract, treaty, bargain, covenant; terms of an agreement; pledge or promise
    Pers, I plihte þe my trouþe To folfulle þe Foreward. — Piers Plowman, c1390
    To tak or ȝef temporal þing for goostly þing of forþword or certeyn couenaunt, it is symonye. — An Apology for Lollard Doctrines, Attributed to Wicliffe, c1475

ReferencesEdit

  • Middle English Dictionary
  • A Concise Dictionary of Middle English, Mayhew and Skeat

Old EnglishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From fore- +‎ -weard.

AdjectiveEdit

fōreward

  1. forward, fore, former, early, prior
    On fórewardre ðyssere béc ys awriten be me
    In the fore part of this book it is written by me.
DeclensionEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From fore- +‎ ward (ward, keeping).

NounEdit

fōreward f (nominative plural fōrewarde)

  1. an agreement, compact, treaty
    His bróðer griþ and fórewarde eall æftercwæþ — His brother, peace and treaties renounced
DeclensionEdit

ReferencesEdit

  • 2010, J. Bosworth, An Anglo-Saxon Dictionary Online (T. N. Toller & Others, Eds.), foreward