Last modified on 10 July 2014, at 13:58

forthspeaking

EnglishEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From forth- +‎ speaking.

NounEdit

forthspeaking (plural forthspeakings)

  1. The act of speaking forth or declaring; declaration.
    • 1873, John Langdon Dudley, Tides and tendencies of religious thought:
      Revelation means nothing else. It is the forthputting, forthspeaking of the interior of God's nature, [...]
    • 2008, Herbert F. Tucker, Epic: Britain's heroic muse, 1790-1910:
      Can there be a more dubious moment in the entire poem than this precariously enjambed impersonation of prophetic forthspeaking?
  2. Prophecy.
    • 1901, Louis Wallis, An examination of society from the standpoint of evolution:
      Evolution of prophecy, or forthspeaking on behalf of the divine.
  3. Revelation.
    • 1888, Bible readings for the home circle:
      "This refers not to ordinary religious discourses for the edification of the church, but to such a forthspeaking of the mind of God in relation to truth, duty, or coming events ns the inward action of the Holy Spirit on the mind may produce."

Etymology 2Edit

From forthspeak +‎ -ing.

AdjectiveEdit

forthspeaking (comparative more forthspeaking, superlative most forthspeaking)

  1. Speaking forth; declaring; prophesying.
    • 2008, Hugh Davis, The making of James Agee:
      In fact, in this political poetry Agee resembles nothing so much as the “ forthspeaking prophet” evoked by Paul Ashdown, who assumes a role “both satirical and visionary, to both attack and inspire [his] readers and to seek meaning in ostensibly trivial or grotesque events."

VerbEdit

forthspeaking

  1. Present participle of forthspeak.