Last modified on 2 June 2014, at 12:02

frenzy

EnglishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle English, from Old French frenesie, from Latin phrenesis, from Ancient Greek *φρένησις (*phrénēsis), a later equivalent of φρενῖτις (phrenîtis, inflammation of the brain): see frantic and frenetic.

PronunciationEdit

  • (file)

NounEdit

frenzy (plural frenzies)

  1. A state of wild activity or panic.
    She went into a cleaning frenzy to prepare for the unexpected guests.
  2. A violent agitation of the mind approaching madness; rage.
    • Addison
      All else is towering frenzy and distraction.
    • William Shakespeare, A midsummer Night's Dream, Act 5, scene 1:
      The poet's eye in a fine frenzy rolling.

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

AdjectiveEdit

frenzy (comparative more frenzy, superlative most frenzy)

  1. (obsolete) mad; frantic
    • 1678 John Bunyan The Pilgrim's Progress:
      They thought that some frenzy distemper had got into his head.

VerbEdit

frenzy (third-person singular simple present frenzies, present participle frenzying, simple past and past participle frenzied)

  1. (uncommon) To render frantic.

External linksEdit