Last modified on 6 June 2014, at 12:06

frugal

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle French, from Latin frugalis "virtuous, thrifty"

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

frugal (comparative more frugal, superlative most frugal)

  1. Avoiding unnecessary expenditure either of money or of anything else which is to be used or consumed; avoiding waste.
    • 1776, Adam Smith, An Inquiry into the Nature and Causes of the Wealth of Nations, Book II, Chapter III:
      By what a frugal man annually saves, he not only affords maintenance to an additional number of productive hands, for that or the ensuing year, but [also] establishes as it were a perpetual fund for the maintenance of an equal number in all times to come.

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FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Late Latin frūgālis.

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

frugal m (feminine frugale, masculine plural frugaux, feminine plural frugales)

  1. frugal, austere

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GalicianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin frūgālis.

AdjectiveEdit

frugal m, f (plural frugais)

  1. frugal, economical

PortugueseEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin frūgālis.

AdjectiveEdit

frugal m, f (plural frugales; comparable)

  1. frugal, economical

SpanishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin frūgālis.

AdjectiveEdit

frugal m, f (plural frugales)

  1. frugal, economical