Last modified on 12 December 2014, at 00:13

fume

See also: fumé and fumê

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle English, from Old French fum (smoke, steam, vapour), from Latin fūmus, from Proto-Indo-European *dʰuh₂mós (smoke), from Proto-Indo-European *dhūw- (to smoke, raise dust). More at dun, dusk.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

fume (plural fumes)

  1. A gas or vapour/vapor that smells strongly or is dangerous to inhale. Fumes are solid particles formed by condensation from the gaseous state, e.g. metal oxides from volatilized metals. They can flocculate and coalesce. Their particle size is between 0.1 and 1 micron. (A micron is one millionth of a metre)
    Don't stand around in there breathing the fumes while the adhesive cures.
    • T. Warton
      the fumes of new shorn hay
  2. A material that has been vaporized from the solid state to the gas state and re-coalesced to the solid state.
  3. Rage or excitement which deprives the mind of self-control.
    the fumes of passion
    (Can we find and add a quotation of South to this entry?)
  4. Anything unsubstantial or airy; idle conceit; vain imagination.
    • Francis Bacon
      a show of fumes and fancies
  5. The incense of praise; inordinate flattery.
    • Burton
      to smother him with fumes and eulogies

TranslationsEdit

VerbEdit

fume (third-person singular simple present fumes, present participle fuming, simple past and past participle fumed)

  1. To emit fumes.
    • Milton
      where the golden altar fumed
    • Roscommon
      Silenus lay, / Whose constant cups lay fuming to his brain.
  2. To expose something (especially wood) to ammonia fumes in order to produce dark tints.
  3. To feel or express great anger.
    He's still fuming about the argument they had yesterday.
    • Dryden
      He frets, he fumes, he stares, he stamps the ground.
    • Sir Walter Scott
      Her mother did fret, and her father did fume.
  4. To be as in a mist; to be dulled and stupefied.
    • Shakespeare
      Keep his brain fuming.
  5. To pass off in fumes or vapours.
    • Cheyne
      Their parts are kept from fuming away by their fixity.

TranslationsEdit

Usage notesEdit

  • In the sense of strong-smelling or dangerous vapor, the noun is typically plural, as in the example.

AsturianEdit

VerbEdit

fume

  1. first-person singular present subjunctive of fumar
  2. third-person singular present subjunctive of fumar

FrenchEdit

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

fume

  1. first-person singular present indicative of fumer
  2. third-person singular present indicative of fumer
  3. first-person singular present subjunctive of fumer
  4. third-person singular present subjunctive of fumer
  5. second-person singular imperative of fumer

AnagramsEdit


GalicianEdit

VerbEdit

fume

  1. first-person singular present subjunctive of fumar
  2. third-person singular present subjunctive of fumar

LatinEdit

NounEdit

fūme

  1. vocative singular of fūmus

PortugueseEdit

VerbEdit

fume

  1. First-person singular (eu) present subjunctive of fumar
  2. Third-person singular (ele, ela, also used with tu and você?) present subjunctive of fumar
  3. Third-person singular (você) affirmative imperative of fumar
  4. Third-person singular (você) negative imperative of fumar

SpanishEdit

VerbEdit

fume

  1. Formal second-person singular (usted) imperative form of fumar.
  2. First-person singular (yo) present subjunctive form of fumar.
  3. Formal second-person singular (usted) present subjunctive form of fumar.
  4. Third-person singular (él, ella, also used with usted?) present subjunctive form of fumar.

TarantinoEdit

NounEdit

fume

  1. smoke