Last modified on 8 January 2015, at 19:30

gallerist

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

gallery +‎ -ist, possibly by analogy with artist,[1] or influenced by French galeriste;[2] compare German galerist. Attested since 1962, popular in US since 2000s.[2]

NounEdit

gallerist (plural gallerists)

  1. The owner or operator of an art gallery
    • 1962, Arts Canada, Volume 19, p. 244:
      Artists become gallerists in order to ensure a viewing.
    • 1989, Punch, Volume 297, p. 26:
      Gallerist: Currently favored title for someone who owns a gallery. Avoids unpleasant associations with ownership (ie the tarnishing of one’s passion for art with the metallic hues of hard cash); also suggests a certain affinity with the word ‘artist’.
      West Coast: Used by East Coast critics, gallerists, and collectors to describe anything produced west of the Hudson …
    • 2007 April 26, “A Little Reality, a Lot of Fantasy”, New York Times:
      It’s an aesthetic that particularly appeals to the art dealers and gallerists who were scouring the Milan fringe shows for new talent last week.

Usage notesEdit

In US, more commonly used by newer entrants,[2] particularly to avoid commercial connotations of dealer[2] or owner,[1] and to suggest a closer relationship with the artist, as someone who represents artists.[2] Sometimes distinguished by gallerist being an operator of an art gallery, operating in the primary market (i.e., sales of new artwork), while dealer referring to the secondary market (i.e., reselling art).[2]

SynonymsEdit

TranslationsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. 1.0 1.1 Punch, Volume 297, 1989, p. 26:
    Gallerist: Currently favored title for someone who owns a gallery. Avoids unpleasant associations with ownership (ie the tarnishing of one’s passion for art with the metallic hues of hard cash); also suggests a certain affinity with the word ‘artist’.
  2. 2.0 2.1 2.2 2.3 2.4 2.5 2.6 Old Business, New Name: Behold the Gallerist”, The New York Times, Grace Glueck, December 24, 2005

AnagramsEdit