Last modified on 22 July 2014, at 23:05

garbage

Garbage.

EnglishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

Middle English "the offal of a fowl, giblets, kitchen waste", originally "refuse, what is purged away" from Old French garber "to refine, make neat or clean", of Germanic origin, akin to Old High German garawan "to prepare, make ready", Old English ġearwian (to make ready, adorn). More at garb, yare, gear

PronunciationEdit

  • (file)

NounEdit

garbage (uncountable)

  1. Useless or disposable material; waste material of any kind.
  2. Nonsense; gibberish.
  3. (often attributively) Something or someone worthless.
    • 2009, David R. Portney, 129 More Seminar Speaking Success Tips, ISBN 9780967851488, p. 8:
      Forget about that garbage advice to “act natural”.
  4. (computing) Data that cannot or will not be accessed by a program, but are still taking up space.
  5. (computing) Data that make no sense to the program trying to use them.

SynonymsEdit

AntonymsEdit

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TranslationsEdit

VerbEdit

garbage (third-person singular simple present garbages, present participle garbaging, simple past and past participle garbaged)

  1. (transitive, obsolete) To eviscerate.
    • 1674, John Josselyn, Two Voyages to New England, Made During the Years 1638-63 (quoted in William Butts Mershon, The Passenger Pigeon, 1907, The Outing Publishing Company):
      I have bought at Boston a dozen Pidgeons ready pulled and garbidged for three pence.

SynonymsEdit

Usage notesEdit

This word is chiefly US.

See alsoEdit