Last modified on 10 January 2015, at 12:21

gato

GalicianEdit

EtymologyEdit

Latin cattus

NounEdit

gato m (plural gatos)

  1. cat

Derived termsEdit


LadinoEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Late Latin cattus, of Afro-Asiatic origin.

NounEdit

gato m (Latin spelling, plural gatos)

  1. cat

PortugueseEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Portuguese gato, from Late Latin cattus, from Latin catta, from Late Egyptian čaute, feminine of caus (jungle cat, African wildcat), from earlier Egyptian tešau (female cat).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

gato m (plural gatos, feminine gata, feminine plural gatas)

  1. cat (domestic cat: Felis silvestris catus)
    • 2000, J. K. Rowling, Lya Wyler, Harry Potter e o Prisioneiro de Azkaban, Rocco, page 55:
      [...] o gato ronronava feliz nos braços de Hermione.
      [...] the cat was purring happily on Hermione's arms.
  2. feline
  3. (slang) very handsome man

SynonymsEdit

AdjectiveEdit

gato m (feminine gata, masculine plural gatos, feminine plural gatas, comparable)

  1. (of a person) attractive

InflectionEdit


SpanishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Late Latin cattus (compare Catalan gat, French chat, Italian gatto, Portuguese gato), of Afro-Asiatic origin. More at cat.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

gato m (plural gatos, feminine gata)

  1. cat, tomcat (male or unspecified gender)
  2. (Mexico) servant

SynonymsEdit

Derived termsEdit


WelshEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

Alternative formsEdit

VerbEdit

gato

  1. (literary) third-person singular subjunctive of gadael

MutationEdit

Welsh mutation
radical soft nasal aspirate
gato ato ngato unchanged
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.

Etymology 2Edit

VerbEdit

gato

  1. Soft mutation of cato.

MutationEdit

Welsh mutation
radical soft nasal aspirate
cato gato nghato chato
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.