get away with murder

EnglishEdit

VerbEdit

get away with murder

  1. (idiomatic) To do something bad or illegal and not be punished.
    • 1980, Gore Vidal and Robert J. Stanton, Views from a Window: Conversations with Gore Vidal, L. Stuart, ISBN 0818403020, page 245:
      Just yesterday it was fashionable to be black. Remember? Any black writer could get away with murder, just as any Jewish-American writer can get away with murder.
    • 1984, James Purdy, On Glory's Course, Viking Press, ISBN 0670524514, page 147:
      He'd spoil the boy just as we have all spoiled him, and though he's a big strapping fellow and a soldier at that, he'd let Ned get away with murder just as I've done.
    • 2000, Claudia Bishop, Marinade for Murder, Berkley, ISBN 0425176118:
      It's because you let people get away with murder, Quill.
    • 2005, James M. Hill, Sr., I Have Been Blessed!: Hard Work and Happiness, Aforesight Press, ISBN 0977485994, page 205:
      He said I found out about everything he did and said, 'I can't get away with nothing, and Jim can get away with murder.' I don't think that I let any of my kids get away with murder, and I don't think any one of them ever did much serious mischief.
Last modified on 20 June 2013, at 14:06