EnglishEdit

Etymology 1Edit

NounEdit

goll (plural golls)

  1. (obsolete) hand
    • 1609, Francis Beaumont and John Fletcher, Philaster[1]:
      Then give me thy Princely goll, which thus I kisse, to whom I crouch and bow; But see my royall sparke, this head-strong swarme that follow me humming like a master Bee, have I led forth their Hives, and being on wing, and in our heady flight, have seazed him shall suffer for thy wrongs.
    • 1622, Thomas Dekker, The Noble Spanish Soldier[2]:
      Give me thy goll , thou are a noble girl.

Etymology 2Edit

From God

Proper nounEdit

goll

  1. (euphemistic) God
    • 1900, Edward Noyes Westcott, The Christmas Story from David Harum[3]:
      'I dunno what you mean,' says Jim. 'Yes, ye do, goll darn ye!' says Dick, 'yes, ye do.
    • 1919, Various, The Best Short Stories of 1917[4]:
      By goll! that's all I'm good for to take on now.

ManxEdit

NounEdit

goll m

  1. Verbal noun of immee.
  2. going

SynonymsEdit

Derived termsEdit

MutationEdit

Manx mutation
Radical Lenition Eclipsis
goll gholl ngoll
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.
Last modified on 7 November 2013, at 11:28