good faith

EnglishEdit

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EtymologyEdit

Translated from Latin bonā fide (“in good faith”), the ablative of bona fides (“good faith”)[1], between 1890 and 1895.[2]

NounEdit

good faith (uncountable)

  1. Good, honest intentions, even if producing unfortunate results.
    He made a mistake, but acted in good faith.
    Although this behavior may look suspicious, we should assume good faith.

TranslationsEdit

AdjectiveEdit

good faith (comparative more good faith, superlative most good faith)

  1. Having or done with good, honest intentions; well-intentioned.
    A good faith buyer.
    A good faith attempt.
  2. Presuming that all parties to a discussion are honest and intend to act in a fair and appropriate manner.
    Good faith bargaining.

Related termsEdit

AntonymsEdit

TranslationsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Merriam-Webster's Dictionary of Law
  2. ^ good faith” in Dictionary.com Unabridged, v1.1, Lexico Publishing Group, 2006.
Last modified on 1 April 2014, at 15:36