Last modified on 22 December 2014, at 04:11

gorge

EnglishEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Middle English, from Old French, from Late Latin gurga, likely connected to Latin gurges (a whirlpool, eddy, gulf or sea)

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

gorge (plural gorges)

  1. A deep narrow passage with steep rocky sides; a ravine.
    • 1956, Delano Ames, chapter 7, Crime out of Mind[1]:
      Our part of the veranda did not hang over the gorge, but edged the meadow where half a dozen large and sleek horses had stopped grazing to join us.
  2. The throat or gullet.
    • Spenser
      Wherewith he gripped her gorge with so great pain.
    • Shakespeare
      Now, how abhorred! [] my gorge rises at it.
  3. That which is gorged or swallowed, especially by a hawk or other fowl.
    • Spenser
      And all the way, most like a brutish beast, / He spewed up his gorge, that all did him detest.
  4. A filling or choking of a passage or channel by an obstruction.
    an ice gorge in a river
  5. (architecture) A concave moulding; a cavetto.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Gwilt to this entry?)
  6. (nautical) The groove of a pulley.
TranslationsEdit

VerbEdit

gorge (third-person singular simple present gorges, present participle gorging, simple past and past participle gorged)

  1. (reflexive, often followed by on) To eat greedily and in large quantities.
    They gorged themselves on chocolate and cake.
  2. To swallow, especially with greediness, or in large mouthfuls or quantities.
    • Johnson
      The fish has gorged the hook.
  3. To glut; to fill up to the throat; to satiate.
    • Dryden
      Gorge with my blood thy barbarous appetite.
    • Addison
      The giant, gorged with flesh, and wine, and blood, / Lay stretch'd at length and snoring in his den []
Derived termsEdit
TranslationsEdit
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Etymology 2Edit

Shortened from gorgeous.

AdjectiveEdit

gorge

  1. (UK, slang) Gorgeous.
    Oh, look at him: isn't he gorge?

AnagramsEdit


FrenchEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

gorge f (plural gorges)

  1. throat
  2. breast
  3. gorge

VerbEdit

gorge

  1. first-person singular present indicative of gorger
  2. third-person singular present indicative of gorger
  3. first-person singular present subjunctive of gorger
  4. first-person singular present subjunctive of gorger
  5. second-person singular imperative of gorger

Derived termsEdit

External linksEdit


ItalianEdit

NounEdit

gorge f

  1. plural form of gorgia

JèrriaisEdit

EtymologyEdit

EB1911 - Volume 01 - Page 001 - 1.svg This entry lacks etymological information. If you are familiar with the origin of this term, please add it to the page as described here.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

gorge f (plural gorges)

  1. (anatomy) throat

Derived termsEdit


Middle FrenchEdit

NounEdit

gorge f (plural gorges)

  1. (anatomy) throat

Old FrenchEdit

NounEdit

gorge f (oblique plural gorges, nominative singular gorge, nominative plural gorges)

  1. throat